The cool, green gel taken from the aloe vera plant (Aloe barbadensis miller) has been implemented in the treatment of wounds and burns for centuries. It is a short plant with a small stem and elongated, elliptical-shaped serrated leaves fanning outward from its base. Ancient Egyptians once referred to aloe as “the plant of immortality.” Today, this medicinal plant is mostly cultivated by hand, however species of Aloe Vera are said to originate from northern Africa. Abundant in nutrients, the aloe plant is said to contain at least 75 active components advantageous to health. Aside from being a bountiful source of vitamins A, B, C and E, aloe contains a long list of enzymes, minerals and beneficial sugars our body welcomes. Aloe is also known for having healing, analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antiseptic properties. Some experts say applying aloe to skin can even boost levels of collagen production. Most notably, Aloe Vera is recognized for the instant relief the gel of its leaves provides to burns when applied topically. According to the U.S. National Library of Medicine, Aloe Vera contains auxins as well as gibberellines which are elements known to promote healing and reduce signs of inflammation.